Scottish Chamber Orchestra

Leleux placed himself firmly centre-stage as soloist, producing miraculously liquid runs, exquisitely shaped melodies, and most importantly, seeming to have a whale of a time in the process.

“His opening Haydn Bear Symphony seemed to grab you by the scruff of the neck and demand that you pay attention – it was far from everyday easy listening, but fresh, surprising, contrary and revelatory by turn. Leleux made every phrase tell a story, sometimes transforming the most innocuous figurations into startling interjections. In the “Haydn” Oboe Concerto in C that followed (almost certainly not by that composer, scholars now agree), Leleux placed himself firmly centre-stage as soloist, producing miraculously liquid runs, exquisitely shaped melodies, and most importantly, seeming to have a whale of a time in the process. Not surprisingly, the audience lapped it up.”

The Scotsman

“In his solo piece, Leleux displayed all the virtuosity of a world-class musician, following the grand opening to the Oboe Concerto, and the roll on the timpani, we entered a courtly dance. Leleux is good to watch not only as a conductor but demanding your attention with his almost exhibitionist movement giving full expression to his instrument, rapidly fingering along the oboe, his playing beautiful to listen to, even if one is not familiar with the oboe as a solo instrument. Surely he can bring more popularity to this fascinating instrument? He eloquently characterised the harmonies of the piece, colourful and piquant, brilliantly elegiac, and at times lamenting too, Leleux is like a singer expressing himself in music and throughout creates a narrative in what is almost a symphonic work. The finale was bright, artistically finely executed.”

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